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Thread: Semi-auto Barrel nut/can

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    Semi-auto Barrel nut/can

    I am looking at buying a WLA semi-auto Sterling and filling out my Form 1 paperwork to cut the barrel down to a SBR. I want to use the Sterling with a Gemtech Mossad suppressor. I understand that the semi-auto Sterling has a threaded barrel nut. Does anyone know what its thread pattern is? Would an UZI threaded suppressor work on a cut-down barrel?

    If not, I suppose I could leave a little bit of the barrel intact beyond the nut and have the barrel threaded for an adaptor made by TROS. Any thoughts? Surely I cannot be the first person to have thought about going this route.

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    Registered User sunnybean's Avatar
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    I has been discussed. Don't quote me on this, but I think I remember someone saying that the threads for the barrel nut are 5/8x24. You will not be able to use a suppressor threaded for an uzi unless you made a custom barrel nut that was threaded like an uzi on the outside. If you add a three lug you will kill the ability to take the barrel off if they are permenatly attached. The three lugs will not allow you to get the barrel nut off and if you could then it would hang up on the front of the tube. My hope is that I can thread the barrel to 1/2x28" in front of the barrel nut. There should be enough diameter to the barrel to do this...but it will be close. If this works, then adding a screw on three lug adapter might work too. Now, if the ATF would just get my F1 back I'd tell you for sure.

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    1/2x28 is a standard thread size for a 9mm suppressor.
    Threading the barrel nut is probably not a good idea since the bore of a suppressor attached to the barrel nut may not always line up with the bore of the barrel inviting an expensive baffle strike.

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    Registered User sunnybean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by watcher
    1/2x28 is a standard thread size for a 9mm suppressor.
    Threading the barrel nut is probably not a good idea since the bore of a suppressor attached to the barrel nut may not always line up with the bore of the barrel inviting an expensive baffle strike.
    Huh? I thought 1/2x36 was the standard 9mm thread so you don't throw a 5.56 can on a 9mm.

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    Sunny,
    Most manufacturers can provide a series of threads in any suppressor caliber. 1/2x28 is sometimes referred to as "US standard for 9mm" although I am sure many would argue with this. Metrics are another matter.
    I cannot comment on the problem of mixing up a 9mm and a .556 suppressor since I do not bother to suppress rifles firing supersonic rounds. I suppose that, following Murphy's Law, if some idiot can do it it has been done. I imagine it is the sort of thing you only do once.
    Now, apparently, some people do shoot .556 with 9mm suppressors.

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    Registered User DINK's Avatar
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    1/2-28 is standard for .223 cans (and also for .22 rimfire) because that's what Gene Stoner put on the AR-15. Everyone else just followed. When Colt started making the 9mm SMGs, they made 1/2-36 the standard thread for the 9mm flash hiders because they didn't want some nimrod screwing a .223 FH on a 9mm barrel and trying to squeeze a 9mm slug through it. They weren't even thinking about silencers.

    The 7.62x39 uppers also use 1/2-36 threads.

    A lot of silencer manufacturers use 1/2-28 for 9mm cans because it works fine and they are already set up to do those threads. You do have to be careful to put the right threads together.

    To get back to the original post- is the assumption that the semi Sterling uses a barrel nut correct? I didn't think so. If I was SBRing one, I would just whack off the barrel to leave about 1/2" sticking out the front and thread it to match whatever can I already had. That's how I put a can on my Stenling- I had Scott Andrey make me a barrel that was longer and threaded, then opened up the hole in the front of the receiver a bit so it could stick out the front. It works very nicely with a YHM Wraith XL and 147 gr. ammo.

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    Guys,
    Thanks for the valuable insight. I suppose since this is only semi-auto, I will just have the barrel cut down and leave 1/2" beyond the nut that will be threaded for a screw-on 9mm can. No real need to use the Mossad with the larger dedicated UZI mount.

  8. #8
    Registered User DINK's Avatar
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    I'm assuming that the Mossad uses the threads on the Uzi receiver that normally accommodate the barrel nut. If so, TROS makes an adapter that you could use to mount that can on your Sterling after you chop the barrel and thread it 1/2-28 (or 1/2-36). That way you could have an unobtrusive thread protector on it when you are shooting loudly, then put the TROS adapter on and use the Mossad. TROS (AKA Mark McWillis) makes good stuff.

    http://www.trosusa.com/

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    Quote Originally Posted by DINK
    1/2-28 is standard for .223 cans (and also for .22 rimfire) because that's what Gene Stoner put on the AR-15. Everyone else just followed. When Colt started making the 9mm SMGs, they made 1/2-36 the standard thread for the 9mm flash hiders because they didn't want some nimrod screwing a .223 FH on a 9mm barrel and trying to squeeze a 9mm slug through it. They weren't even thinking about silencers.

    The 7.62x39 uppers also use 1/2-36 threads.

    A lot of silencer manufacturers use 1/2-28 for 9mm cans because it works fine and they are already set up to do those threads. You do have to be careful to put the right threads together.

    To get back to the original post- is the assumption that the semi Sterling uses a barrel nut correct? I didn't think so. If I was SBRing one, I would just whack off the barrel to leave about 1/2" sticking out the front and thread it to match whatever can I already had. That's how I put a can on my Stenling- I had Scott Andrey make me a barrel that was longer and threaded, then opened up the hole in the front of the receiver a bit so it could stick out the front. It works very nicely with a YHM Wraith XL and 147 gr. ammo.
    That was my pipe dream for my MKIV but I'm still working on it.
    Opera Non Verbra

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    That's my plan Dink. I am buying an original barrel to use as a pattern for a longer custom item because a search did not find any custom Sterling barrel makers. Is Scott Andrey still around and do you have contact information for him?

    I have not looked at the WLA conversion but I get the impression they use a barrel nut. I prefer to stay a bit more original. Gotta love those hex. head bolts.

    To get back to the thread (no pun), when you cut the barrel thread for a suppressor only perfection is good enough. You get a better job if the thread is on the barrel rather than some other part of the gun that is not guaranteed to be in perfect alignment with the bore.

  11. #11
    Registered User DINK's Avatar
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    I agree that adapters are to be avoided if possible, but sometimes you have no choice. If they are made with precision, they work.

    Scott is still doing his thing as far as I know. The website is:

    http://www.samachine.com/

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    Thanks again for all of the info. I will send the 16" semi-auto barrel to Gemtech for cutting, crowning and threading. Not the least expensive way to go about things but they do fantastic work at a reasonable price and they guaranty the work with the warranty on their cans.

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    Thanks Dink,
    Just what I need - no point in reinventing the wheel.

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