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Thread: Is This a Firing Pin Assembly?? Please Help

  1. #21
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    Try usbarrel shrouds or the parts kit i mentioned will have all the parts you need to make it run.

    I figured the gun either had a reg. Kicker in it or a selector bar modded to jump the FA stop. And a lipped bolt.

    Wasn't worth the money i bid but i was pretty sure it would go for more and it did.

    How did it come registered on tbe paperwork?

    Rich

    ETA:

    This is the kit you need to fix your gun.
    I'd buy the grip from you if you were to sell it.

    I will probably buy another one of these kits i have one already but they are the cheapest and most complete for the money. They have a little more then 30 left in stock.
    https://www.gunpartscorp.com/products/1432300B
    Last edited by root; 08-11-2018 at 02:37 PM.

  2. #22
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    Here are More pictures
    Where I am pointing my screwdriver , it seems that the modifield firing pin assy makes contact with that.What is that part called?
    Also full auto is at the rear, safe is in the middle and Semi is to the front.
    I sort of remarked it with a magic marker






  3. #23
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    That's the sear and the part welded on on the semi bolt is the sear catch.

    Again tbat parts kit will fix the ghetto butchered gun and if you sell your left overs from tbe kit you won't be out much money.

    You need the bolt out of the kit and a FA sear for the grip and straighten out/ square up that right side sear hole in the receiver.

    Or send it out have them charge you what ever to fix it and wait for a long turn around on a 15 minute fix.

    I sure wouldn'tfix that bolt unless that's the registerd part. And i've asked twice how the gun is papered.

    Rich

  4. #24
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    That’s a really interesting modification. The bolt doesn’t have the fully shrouded bolt face and it looks like it was made to function as a closed bolt on every round, not just the first round of a burst. From what I see it appears that the sear you’re pointing at with the screwdriver holds the modified striker assembly back and when the bolt rides forward it depresses the other side of the sear tripping the striker. The usual sear is forward of that just visible on the left of your picture. A picture of the lower internals would be helpful.

    As Root asked, is this a registered receiver?
    Last edited by TSPC; 08-11-2018 at 08:37 PM.

  5. #25
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    All the micros and pistols fire from a closed bolt.

    As RD said this is just a poor conversion probably due to lack of parts pre 86.

    Rich

    Fixed for the smart fone not being so smart
    Last edited by root; 08-12-2018 at 04:58 PM.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by root View Post
    All the mi ros and pkstols fire from a closex bolt.

    Rich
    The usual closed bolts fire from a closed bolt on the first round of a burst and then the rest of the burst operates similar to an open bolt; The bolt and striker move forward as one unit. That's why a fully shrouded bolt face is needed on the typical closed bolt, the firing pin is already protruding through the bolt as it moves forward on the second and subsequent rounds of a burst. This set up looks like it will fire from a closed bolt on every round similar to the dual sear closed bolt in RoverDave's book. If so it may slow down the ROF as well. I would still change it to the normal configuration.
    Last edited by TSPC; 08-11-2018 at 08:32 PM.

  7. #27
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    Ah, now I know what you have! The modification made to the striker assembly isn't needed for a normal conversion, but this isn't a normal conversion. in 1984, Firepower Publications put out a booklet called "Micro UZI Machine Pistol", which was a guide to converting a semi-auto UZI pistol to a full auto Micro UZI. It was still legal for civilians to do their own full auto conversions back then (with proper form 1 approval). The conversion shown in the book includes a secondary sear for the purpose of slowing down the rate of fire. (In more recent years, IMI/IWI developed a much much simpler secondary sear to slow down the Mini UZI and Micro UZI in closed bolt configurations.) The piece welded on to the striker is needed to operate the secondary sear. Looking at your photos, I don't think you need to worry about it breaking. You could have someone weld the piece on more securely but it's probably fine. The photos in the booklet look very similar.

    Because of the secondary sear, the semi-auto bolt works fine in full auto without having a lower lip on the bolt face. That's because the striker doesn't ride forward with the bolt during full auto fire. it also means the rate of fire should be much slower than a normal Micro UZI. It's probably quite pleasant to shoot. It's hard to say how this thing was registered. Probably as a registered receiver, though with all of the modifications you may need to leave it as is. To convert to a standard-style conversion would require a bolt with a lower lip, which is probably considered a machine gun on it's own in a Micro.

    You can buy a copy of the booklet here: https://www.amazon.com/MACHINE-PISTO.../dp/B001QZ9II8
    Looking for the definitive reference book on UZI history and technical information? Check out my book The UZI Submachine Gun Examined. Details to order a copy are here.

  8. #28
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    i just ordered the book you suggested, Dave
    and tomorrrow I am buying your new book!!
    Thanks for your help.
    Do you think i should purchase a spare firing pin assembly to have as
    a backup?

  9. #29
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    I wouldn't be overly worried about needing a backup striker. The most likely thing to happen to the one you have is for that customized bar to break off. If it did, it would be much easier to weld it back on than to start with a new striker and fit a new piece to it. There are several parts in that gun that are custom for this conversion so if any of them break you'll have to have them repaired or remanufactured. See how well it shoots and how often you're likely to shoot it before worrying about spare parts. Without a stock it's mostly just a curiosity that you won't shoot very often. You might want to consider having a stock put on it, which requires welding the stock hinge to the back of the receiver.

    Take a video of the gun being fired so we can see what the rate of fire looks like.
    Looking for the definitive reference book on UZI history and technical information? Check out my book The UZI Submachine Gun Examined. Details to order a copy are here.

  10. #30
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    Had to get out my copy of FIREPOWER ( I have two of that issue for some reason.)

    Haris1
    Once you have that magazine you will see what RD is talking about.
    If I were you and your gun is converted that way ( appears to be so) I'd go back and stay with that conversion and fix it.
    looking at the pix in the books it's a real good clean conversion.
    Looking @ your gun it looks like my 8 year old did it. NO OFFENSE but yours was done either in haste or just hacked together to work.

    I'd send it out to BWE with the copy of the 1984 issue and have him correct it to what the magazine shows.
    I'd suspect BWE could make the parts look and act factory instead of rough welds and dremmel marks.

    Your bolt and sear are wrong. probably good enough to work but only remotely close to the craftsmanship & geometry done in the book.

    Once you see the magazine article and pix you will understand.

    Glad someone was able to figure out what you have and the source of original conversion to correct it.

    Rich

  11. #31
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    It would be really interesting to hear what your rate of fire is with the closed bolt configuration. A normal Closed bolt runs incredibly fast due to the increased spring pressure. With yours firing from the closed bolt on each round it should be much slower. Being somewhat unique, I would not change the configuration, but might have it cleaned up as Rich suggested. I don't know how many of these conversions were done and legally registered, but I doubt it is that many. If it functions reliably and has a controllable ROF, it might be worth more to the right collector than a standard conversion.

    If you want to add on a folding stock without welding, Title II Arms makes one that bolts on. I will warn you that it is a one man shop and the Micro stock is not a stock item so it will take a long time to get it.

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