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Thread: Black Jack Buffer & UZI SMG Long-Term?

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    Black Jack Buffer & UZI SMG Long-Term?

    Hello Folks! I was curious of everyone's experiences and thoughts of using Black Jack buffers in a IMI UZI full size 9mm SMG.... long-term is it... Good, Bad, or Ugly? Etc.

    Seen all the great videos of bumped up RPMs some like 900+ etc. Read a few past posts here as well. My main concern/question, does the increased rate of fire/rounds per minute, beat the receiver/other parts to hell, especially with prolonged use? OR the UZI design can take it without issues? (Of course the recoil spring would need more frequent replacements.) Thanks!

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    My answer is a combination of anecdote plus consideration of forces stressing metal welds.

    Anyway, thought some after my backplate welds went. Decided to stop using them. Thought some more, and repurposed a very worn 9mm recoil spring for .22rf only.

    Wasn't a big deal to reweld the backplate tho.

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    Interesting, the backplate, thanks Samuel.

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    I’ve been using a 1 inch buffer for thousands and thousands of rounds in my gun I never had an issue.

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    That's very cool Mike, thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Galil#1 View Post
    That's very cool Mike, thanks!
    Reckon the Mini and Micro UZIs with thinner sheetmetal (yet heat treated) and operates 900+ RPM... don't know if they are any more re-enforced in the back etc.?

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    At todays prices if you can afford enough ammo to break it…

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    Quote Originally Posted by Redhed View Post
    At todays prices if you can afford enough ammo to break itů


    That's what me likes to hear, but not the $$$ ammo part tho :-(

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    If it helps, the backplate welds on mine let go past 20k rounds. And I understand that famous "3 million round" rental IMI had the backplate done more than once.

    If the buffers deliver something you want, go for it. Wasn't a crazy expensive repair, anyway.

    Slower ROF works for me so.......

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    That sounds good Samuel, makes sense. When I get mine, will test/play with it and see what ROF I like best as well. Great to have choices!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel_Hoggson View Post
    If it helps, the backplate welds on mine let go past 20k rounds. And I understand that famous "3 million round" rental IMI had the backplate done more than once.

    If the buffers deliver something you want, go for it. Wasn't a crazy expensive repair, anyway.

    Slower ROF works for me so.......
    From what I've read, the receivers of West Hurley Thompson Model 1928 submachine guns would crack at the rear at very low round counts when a speed up bolt from a company called Gunmachines was used. The steel in the West Hurley Thompson Model 1928 submachine guns is a high lead content alloy that is said to be nearly impossible to weld. IIRC, some of the Group Industries Uzi receivers cracked at relatively low round counts, but were easy to repair.

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    Never knew like a 10+ lbs. beast heavy steel Thompson could shit out like that? Built like a brick shithouse... I see some folks don't want the W.H. made Thompsons, the CT Bridgeports are the "originals" best made ones etc.? Good to know the UZIs are easy ish to repair. Thanks for sharing 2A!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Galil#1 View Post
    Never knew like a 10+ lbs. beast heavy steel Thompson could shit out like that? Built like a brick shithouse... I see some folks don't want the W.H. made Thompsons, the CT Bridgeports are the "originals" best made ones etc.? Good to know the UZIs are easy ish to repair. Thanks for sharing 2A!
    IIRC, the usual pecking order for most Thompson submachine guns places the 15,000 units that Colt's made for Auto Ordnance in 1921-1922 at the top. Next usually goes to the WWII era Thompsons made by Auto Ordnance and Savage. IIRC, there were some Thompsons assembled from left over parts post-WWII. The West Hurley 1970s and 80s made guns are usually considered lower.
    There were also a few Thompsons made by Pearl and Chasan, and there are weld-ups made from demilled receivers before the 86 ban. I don't know how one rates or categorizes them.
    MHO, YMMV, etc.

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    2A, yes interesting when your think about it... a WWI era SMG, over a 100 years old design yet still a very desired and collectible SMG. Very cool!

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