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Thread: new to the world of Uzi's - a couple of questions related to receiver marks

  1. #1
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    new to the world of Uzi's - a couple of questions related to receiver marks

    I bought my first Uzi Carbine and I love it. But some of the marks on the receiver does not match what I expected.

    1) the finish of the carbine is parkerized, not blued
    2) Fire/Safe markings are above where they should be, and Hebrew marks are also present.
    3) The receiver is marked 9mm/45 acp - I thought the rifle was originally 45 acp, and previous owner reinstalled 9mm block, barrel, and mag - but the markings almost indicate that both calibers are supported - could not find a similarly marked receiver.

    Photos:

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/CAhyQX2fUAPRwvN8A
    https://photos.app.goo.gl/UV3EyDxdDDMZKvaJ6


    Thank you for your help

  2. #2
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    From what I have read, Vector bought IMI receivers and made some semi autos on them. They had to source parts where they could find them, your lower appears to be a converted Israeli lower with the FA position and markings welded over, and the English Safe and Fire marks added above the original Hebrew markings for the same. The picture of the markings on a late made one in the UZI Bible are a bit different, but show .22, 9mm, and .45 cal markings. The earlier ones had the importer, NHM Co, engraved on the bottom of the receiver, the later ones were on the side under the caliber markings. You likely have one of the earlier models with NHM on the bottom.

    Park or paint is the normal UZI finish for most makers.

    Heres some photos of one marked like yours:

    https://www.gunauction.com/buy/16502021

  3. #3
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    From my data: https://www.hkproshop.com/forums/thr...rence-data.33/

    00XXXX

    - left rear receiver- UZI semi.auto/MODEL 45/.45 A C P/IMI - ISRAEL
    - right rear receiver- ACTION ARMS, LTD/Phila.Pa./.45 SA/serial number
    - bottom receiver- N H M CO SAC CA

    HXXX
    NXXXX

    - left receiver- IMI-ISRAEL/UZI SEMI AUTO/ .22/9mm/.45/ IMPTR NHM CO/SAC CA/serial number
    - right receiver- nothing

    GXXX

    - left receiver (center- VECTOR ARMS, NSL, UT; right- UZI semi.auto/MODEL 45/9mm/ electro-stenciled .45 A.C.P./ IMI-ISRAEL)
    - right receiver (left- ACTION ARMS, LTD./Phila. Pa./.45-SA/ /IMI – ISRAEL/serial number)

    Tony

  4. #4
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    Thank you for the information.

    Yes, N H M is o the bottom receiver.

    few follow up questions:

    1) based on this:

    00XXXX

    - left rear receiver- UZI semi.auto/MODEL 45/.45 A C P/IMI - ISRAEL
    - right rear receiver- ACTION ARMS, LTD/Phila.Pa./.45 SA/serial number
    - bottom receiver- N H M CO SAC CA

    mine should be an early import model, correct? If so, what does "early" mean? 1980-1983? or some other date range?

    2) Left receiver is marked "9mm/45 ACP" - why would that be the case, as this Uzi was either imported as a 45 or as a 9mm - not both.

    3) who was the imported? Vector arms? Action Arms? or NHM? and, what's the relationship between these companies? ... as I have all three companies proudly identified on my Uzi - "Action Arms" on the right rear receiver, "vector arms" above "F/S", and NHM on the bottom receiver

    4) from the statement "Vector bought IMI receivers and made some semi autos on them" am I to assume that at some point in it's life, this Uzi was a full auto military issue? And if so, how does "open bolt" vs "closed bolt" consideration plays in to that. - honestly I don't understand what needs to be changed to convert an "open bolt" action to a "closed bolt" action, but, as I read, all military full autos were open bolt

    Thank you,

    Vlad

  5. #5
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    OK, these were never IMI made guns, they were just semi auto receivers made up for a "Central American Country" that was going to build them into complete guns. Apparently the deal fell through and they were sold back to IMI. NHM was an importer and purchased the receivers, importing them into the US. Vector Arms had purchased a lot of the Group Industries MG receivers and was building MGs on them, about 2003 they decided a semi version was viable and began making them on the semi auto GI receivers that were available, using parts sourced from IMI and wherever they could find them or have them made. They also purchased the imported IMI receivers from NHM and made semi auto rifles with those as well. According to the UZI reference book "Initial Shipments" were of your marking pattern, later ones moved the NHM markings to the side where the IMI and caliber markings are. So somewhere in probably the 2003-2006 time frame I would guess was when yours was made.

    NHM is on them because they were the actual importer. IMI is on them because they actually made the receivers in Israel. Vector is on there because they made the receiver into a whole functioning gun.

    As for Action Arms, IIRC that was marked on almost all semi auto IMI made receivers (at IMI in Israel) as they were the main purchaser of that pattern receiver. Likely they simply took a batch of flats or receivers already made with those markings and used them for these receivers. Sometimes they milled out the AA markings, on these they apparently didn't bother.

    These were imported as receivers only, the final maker Vector determined what caliber they were made in. Their later style marked ones added the .22 cal designation as well, probably both to highlight the multi-caliber versatility as well as the legal requirement for the cal to be marked on the gun. One mark covers all possibilities.

    On an open bolt, the firing pin is machined into the breechface in the extended position, as the bolt slams shut the cartridge chambers and stops, the bolt continues on a little further and the FP sets off the primer. As it slams back and forth, it fires each time it closes until ammo is exhausted or the trigger is released and the sear catches the bolt in the rearward position. In the semi auto position, the sear pops back up with every trigger pull, allowing single shots to be fired.

    On the closed bolt version, imagine if you will someone drilled out the firing pin, creating a hole in the bolt front to back. Then they sliced off a thin wafer of the rear of the bolt and attached a long firing pin to it. Now, when the bolt is retracted the sear catches only the wafer (the striker assembly) and holds it back, the bolt is free to slam forward and feed a round. Since the firing pin is now on the striker, it doesn't fire. Pull the trigger and the sear drops, allowing the striker to slam forward, shoving the firing pin through the hole and setting off the primer. The cartridge fires and the bolt slams back, then returns forward chambering the next round. Since the sear popped back up after the trigger was pulled, it catches the striker and holds it rearward until the trigger is released to reset it and pulled again.

    The lower grip assembly in the semi was modified so the selector switch cannot move all the way forward into the FA position, and the sear was reshaped a bit to work better with the striker. To prevent easy conversion to a machine gun, they made certain blocking features so stock FA parts won't fit and other mods here and there.

    That's the quick diagram on the blackboard explanation, there are differences elsewhere as well, but those are the basics.

    This info comes from Dave's book, If you have the means I highly recommend you pick one up. Back in the day it seemed expensive, now it's the price of a box of .22s...

    http://www.uzitalk.com/reference/pages/uzibook.htm

    OH, and if you are unfamiliar with Group Industries, they were a shop that started out making UZI SMG conversion parts and doing conversions on semi auto IMI UZIs. When the MG ban was on the horizon, they switched gears and started making all the SMG receivers they could register before the deadline, eventually making their own US made version of the UZI, both semi and full auto. Due to a lawsuit and other issues, eventually they went bankrupt and all their assets, including the full and semi receivers they had made were auctioned off. Vector bought all the registered MG ones and PARS in Kentucky bought the semi ones. PARS paid the princely sum of 4 cents per receiver, with the AW ban in effect the market for them was seen as exceedingly small. I guess they had the last laugh!


    And there was a closed bolt version of the FA UZIs for sale, basically the semi auto striker assembly was retained but with the three position FA lower. After the first shot, the sear stays down when the trigger is pulled and the striker stays against the bolt as it cycles, with the firing pin extended and then functions as the open bolt does. When the trigger is released, the striker stays back and the bolt closes, feeding a new round but not firing it. With the popularity of the MP5 closed bolt operation they figured it would be worth some sales to have their own closed bolt version. Less disruption of aim without a couple pounds of steel slamming forward when you pull the trigger!
    Last edited by slimshady; 06-15-2021 at 06:46 PM.

  6. #6
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    Thank you very much for the very detailed information!

    I just ordered the book. Thank you!

  7. #7
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    Regarding your markings;
    "9mm /" looks like it was added almost as an after thought by the importer or builder. Depth of engraving and spacing are the giveaways. Nice thing about the full-sized guns is that you can switch back and forth.
    My guess is that your carbine started out life as a .45 ACP

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