Questions on Century Arms Romie G rifle

Gaffshot

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About ten to fifteen years ago Century sold these rifles built on the Romanian Home Guard "G" kits. They were sold with a US made Nato length black synthetic stock. Does anyone know any details about these rifles? Were the parts matching? Did they have the original barrels? Were they built properly? Any thoughts on value today?
 

sniperdoc

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I have a Century Arms "G", but it came with wood furniture. Mags wobble a tiny bit (annoying) but it feeds and functions 100%. I bought it probably 20 years ago. I have no real complaints
 

Deerhurst

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If they were century imports they were built properly.

If century built them it'll be sketchy.

They should be good rifles as long as not century built but are not something I've very seen referred to as a collector piece. The synthetic furniture is not "correct" and likely added to try to appeal to a certain audience or was cheaper than wood.

People will likely spend similar money for a foreign built Romy as they would a WASR10.

Closest thing I have to a Romy G is a pile of Romy G populated barrels for some kit builds.
 

atfsux

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Back when these were being imported as kits, all the parts were matching and this was before Obama demanded the barrels be cut up as "not sporting use", so the barrels were original as well. I got my kit for just $100 from J&G Sales in Prescott, Az. in 2003. So you know the kits cost Century a lot less than that. As far as I am aware, all Century did was use these same kits, replacing only the fire control components and receiver. They did the plastic furniture primarily to increase the American-made parts count to comply with 922 rules. People knocked Century's rifles as crap only because things started to go wrong when non-surplus parts started to be substituted as the plentiful supply ran out. Century contracted machine shops to make clone parts, and most of these were made as castings rather than forgings, and they didn't stand up. The cherry on top was after Obama demanded imported barrels be destroyed and when Century contracted American made barrels for their imported 5.45x39 Polish Tantal kits. Whomever that lowest bidder was didn't get the memo that 5.45x39 is a .220 bore, not .224 like 5.56NATO. Those rifles wouldn't hit the broad side of a barn and were throwing projectiles sideways. That was the nail in the coffin for Century's reputation. At least they never had that problem with their 7.62 rifles. But the later ones using cast American-made trunnions had issues with cracking and short useful lives. The first imported and assembled Romy G rifles, however, because they used all original parts, worked just fine. The only real complaint of those first generation Romy G builds is that Century's assemblers were just getting off the ground and were going through a learning curve. So some of the fit and finish wasn't as good as it could have been. Things like rivets not properly formed or sometimes not fully flush with the receivers. But these were aesthetic issues, not functional ones.
 

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